Top Tips for Your First Bike Tour



Long-distance cycle tours are an inexpensive, fun, challenging and totally memorable way to discover the world. But are you ready to go on one? 

Here are five bike tour hacks you can start with:

Plan early.

Knowing where to go really is the toughest part. Deciding on the date helps seal your trip, providing you a deadline to aim for. Newbies should must go in the warmer months and choose a simple route for at least the first two weeks. Pre-tour training is helpful but not essential. Fitness can come on the road.

Get the right supplies.

Get the essentials: a quality free standing tent, a quality touring bike (not necessarily a pricey one), waterproof bags and a cooking stove. Note that your bags have to be really durable as they will carry all your stuff. At the same time, they must be Go for lightweight and dry to compress your clothes. Careful not to overdo it and spend too much on gear that may not last. 

Know your route. 

No matter where you plan to cycle, forget main roads because busy and usually uninspiring. Look for flat, bike-friendly trails, or a beeline if you're hungry for a thrill. 

Let technology help you.

There was a time when a map was your best Bike Tour SF companion. Now, you can depend on a GPS or navigation app. Choose a durable and multipurpose GPS product made for adventures. Of course, your smartphones will always come in handy - if you there's electricity and the Internet. Maps of the best off-the-beaten-track routes, specifically for cyclists, can be downloaded for free. 

Have a budget.

SF Bike Tour can be very cheap. If you're not picky with what you eat and what's around you, then saving a few US dollars a day will go a long way. Don't forget to factor in costs for food, accommodation, travel insurance and emergency cash.  

Have a personal goal.

Sticking to a daily distances can be hard but having a good idea of what you want and can achieve will help you create your itinerary. A lot of bike tourists go from 60 kilometers to 80 kilometers everyday, depending on conditions. Newbies, on the other hand, should aim for much less. Aside from quality of the roads and the weather, your personal goals have to impact decisions you make along the way - and will usually motivate to carry on.